It’s been a long week, and I take my amusement where I can get it. Now, at this point we should pause to note why green tea -- today considered a tame, health-conscious, Zen beverage -- should be so sinister. Which is a cool concept, backed here by Swedenborg’s mysticism. "Green Tea" An English clergyman named Jennings confides to Hesselius that he is being followed by a demon in the form of an ethereal monkey, invisible to everyone else, which is trying to invade his mind and destroy his life. Detailed Summary & Analysis Prologue Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Chapter 11 Chapter … The Shelleys drank only the best green tea, it was heartily recommended by doctors, and it even constituted 1/5 of the tea destroyed in the Boston Tea Party. Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-73), "The Invisible Prince", Irish journalist and writer, father of the Victorian ghost story. As the party continues on, he stares down the black hole and is drawn the the edge. Amazed, Lady Mary says he’s right on all points. Because why? Two at least. Finally the thing began to speak in his head, blaspheming, ordering him to harm others and himself. Benson stated that Le Fanu's stories "Green Tea", "The Familiar", and "Mr. Justice Harbottle" "are instinct with an awfulness which custom cannot stale, and this quality is due, as in The Turn of the Screw, to Le Fanu's admirably artistic methods in setting and narration". Yet it persisted, never leaving him, never sleeping, always watching, visible even in total dark via a halo like the red glow of embers. The idea sticks in the brain and sometimes leads to disappointment when these horror readers finally pick up the story and read it: the idea of a hellish simian is somehow much more powerful in the abstract and loses its potency in Le Fanu’s prose. In fact, the monkey's voice melds into Jennings' own inner thoughts and begins urging him to commit suicide. He poked it with his umbrella, which passed through the creature’s body without resistance. I send you this. Oldstyle Tales Press publishes annotated and illustrated editions of classic horror, classic weird fiction, classic ghost stories, and gothic novels. One day, while riding an omnibus, Jennings … He urges Jennings to have faith in God and to not lose hope: he has been preserved so far, and it must be for a reason. And then there is Sheridan Le Fanu, whose tale ‘Green Tea’ (1869), perhaps more than any of his other stories, plays out this growing uncertainty surrounding the relationship between the supernatural and the psychological. Plus genetics plays a role in the individual’s reaction to caffeine; not surprising then that Hesselius supposes Jennings must have had one parent who was sensitive to supernatural phenomena—who had seen ghosts. Even, in the end, when Jennings closes his eyes. information about this edition. Jennings is increasingly desperate as the monkey's voice becomes louder and more determined to destroy him. During Le Fanu’s last years, his mind become almost completely occupied by the supernatural and all the short stories he wrote at this time were of that nature e.g. I am so interrupted, disturbed.". He has taken a leave of absence from his parish in the Warwickshire countryside and is spending more and more time cloistered in the library of his townhouse in the London suburb of Richmond. The doctor goes to Jennings’s townhouse and waits in his lofty, narrow library. Thus we find strange bedfellows, and the mortal and immortal prematurely make acquaintance.”. Jennings seems like a weird phantom or goblin himself; he does not seem to be a part of the living world, but a visitant from the supernatural realm. Henry James, M. R. James, Stoker, Stevenson and Doyle all took profound interest in the psychological symbolism of supernatural fiction: Henry James’ father was beset by mental illness (as was Doyle’s), and his psychiatrist brother, William, was a major figure in the field, predating and influencing Freud; Stoker surrounded himself with people who were eccentric actors capable of putting on and removing complex facades without allowing others to know their true selves; M. R. James was drawn to forbidden arcana and apocrypha which stirred in him a mixture of scholarly titillation and religious shame. In more recent times, journalists (Carl Kolchak) and FBI agents (Mulder and Scully) and cute brothers (Dean and Sam Winchester) have led the fight against the uncanny, but surely its most famous warrior can trace his distinguished ancestry back to Hesselius, and that is Dr. Abraham Van Helsing. Personally, I think “Green Tea” would have been improved by removing the titular beverage and replacing it with some sort of malign influence from a lesbian vampire. He is fascinated by Jennings' character -- well liked and admired, yet reclusive; a respected Anglican reverend, yet obsessed with Oriental occultism. There is something deeply personal – tragically personal – about this story of suicidal anguish and alienation from the world of light and laughter. He departs to develop a treatment plan, begging Jennings to call on him at once if the monkey returns. In one of the most sober moments in “Green Tea,” Le Fanu describes Jennings sitting down to tell his tale, face lit up by twilight, seemingly disembodied in the swarming gloom, described as resembling one of Schalken’s eerie paintings. But to Le Fanu there was something darker behind the symbol of the monkey – something even more primitive than the promise of freedom: the fear of appetite (more on that later). However, it returned livelier and more malicious. We learn that this account has been written to a professor who is suffering from a similar tormentor (which adds a chilling layer to the tale), and he closes this letter with his advice to the suicidal sufferer. He doesn’t seem to have considered the opening of this eye a fortunate event, as it brought about a “premature” meeting of mortal and immortal, physical and spiritual, entities. Mythos Making: There are aspects of reality to which most people remain blind and ignorant—and we’re much better off that way. It is speaking. surrounding Le Fanu’s work centers on the social anxiety created during the decline of the Protestant Ascendency in Ireland during the 19thcentury. Although this premise, and the fo. Today we’re looking at Sheridan Le Fanu’s “Green Tea,” first published in his In a Glass Darkly collection in 1872. Jekyll used a blood-red form of phosphorous and a salt-like powder, which – when combined – create a pale green fluid. Particularly if they’re getting all hyperkinetic at you, bouncing around and grimacing and flailing their little fists, as Jennings’s unwelcome companion does whenever its furlough from Hell is up. From Tea’s depiction of a thinly veiled unseen world full of Things Man Is Better Off Not Knowing and Things Man is Better Off Not Grabbing the Attention Of, we can trace his influence on Lovecraft. Leaving aside the theological threat to my very soul lurking in my tea canisters, Jennings’s story is deceptively simple in its nightmarishness. From Dracula and Frankenstein to Henry James and Edgar Allan Poe, we illuminate your journeys through literature's darkest domains. But Hesselius fails: like Jennings, he is drawn to solitude, and does his planning at a remote inn, far from his known lodgings. Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. Green and black tea are made from the same leaves: black tea, however, is dried and oxidated first, while green tea is raw and untreated. They briefly touch on Jennings' maladies -- he dismisses the theories of his physician, Dr. Harley, as the stupid chatter of a "mere materialist" -- but he remains reserved and secretive on the topic. Because it’s so splendidly creepy, that’s why. Deep inside he has – for years and decades – been harboring a starved, ravenous beast who aches to emerge and hates his jailer with a vehemence that overlooks that fact that to destroy him is to destroy himself. See his theories about a spiritual fluid that circulates through the nerves. Four years prior he had begun a massive literary project -- a book on the Gnostic mysticism of Ancient cultures -- that led him to spend late nights reading, fueled by regular cups of strong, black tea. The silence, too, was utter: not a distant wheel, or bark, or whistle from without; and within the depressing stillness of an invalid bachelor's house.I guessed well the nature, though not even vaguely the particulars of the revelations I was about to receive, from that fixed face of suffering that so oddly flushed stood out, like a portrait of Schalken's, before its background of darkness...". ‘Carmilla’ and ‘Green Tea’. From this point on, he started to become addicted to the drink, and began keeping later and later hours, poring over metaphysical texts on the occult. At its heart, “Green Tea” is one of Le Fanu’s most psychological tales: like “The Jolly Corner” and “The Turn of the Screw,” it features proto-Freudian symbolism – the libidinal Monkey whose rage against regulation suggests the Id; Jennings’ book-clothed library – a party room converted from its original purpose – with its two soul-suggesting windows and its two self-critical, Super-Ego-suggesting mirrors, which stands as a model of his conscious mind; his first attempt at suicide (throwing himself into a mine shaft – a symbol of the unconscious: an attempt to give himself over to his Id); his successful suicide, rich with Freudian sexual subtext (his throat is slit into a “gash” – a Victorian euphemism for a vulva – which can be read as self-humiliation: “I am a pussy – I surrender, become submissive, to my repressed, violent, masculine energies: I fuck myself up”); and the much discussed symbolism of the phallic Monkey whose course hair and intrusive nature have been called symbolic of everything from masturbation and pornography, to sodomy and homosexual lust. Not that excessive caffeine couldn’t have done a number on him as well, both in the active intoxification stage and during his voluntary withdrawal from his favorite brew. Dr. Martin Hesselius is an eccentric physician, student of the esoteric, and occult investigator -- something of a cross between Sherlock Holmes, Dr. House, Van Helsing, and Father Brown -- who was travelling through England during the Regency Era when he encountered the strange and unsettling case of Rev. Hesselius agrees to meet with Jennings to assess whether he is suffering from something psychological, supernatural, or -- possibly -- both. Eventually, it grew so strong that he began to see it even when he closes his eyes, and its messages become even more sinister: ordering him to harm himself or others. Spiritual insight? A common fear of green tea consumption was that it would cause chronic, long-term insomnia. There are those who gaze into monkey cages at the zoo with wistful smiles or jealous smirks. Maybe in 1872, the idea that green tea opens one’s inner eye to Things Man Was Not Meant to Know seemed… plausible? Some of my irritation at the conclusion may stem from a “scientific explanation” that wins some sort of award for Showing Its Age. His being a Monkey has more to do with Jennings’ personal archetypes than any connection with the Far East (besides which, the Monkey appears to be a South American breed) – it is his Hyde, his inner tormentor, and all that the green tea is guilty of is opening Jennings’ eye to the monster which he has been harboring throughout his life: the depraved manifestation of decades of masochistic repression and sycophantic yes-man-ing – the child of his own resentment. While I write to you I feel like a man who has but half waked from a frightful and monotonous dream. Hesselius frequently commands him to stop worrying about his demonic visitor because he is in God’s hands (even going so far as to imply that his situation is like that of the biblical Job whom God allowed Satan to test with horrible losses, before rewarding him for his fidelity), but Hesselius seems to miss what contemporary critics are missing when he soothes his friend’s anxieties: the Monkey is not an Oriental djinn or a Chinese god sent from the Far East to torment this pious Christian, a punishment for his only sin – not drinking good ol’ British black tea; no, as the text clearly suggests multiple times, the Monkey has always been there. It was first introduced to Europe in the 1600s, and was popular with teetotalers, vegetarians, and health buffs in England for two centuries. In fact, there are many who might compare the story to a piece of contemporary fan fiction where Jekyll consults Holmes about the problem of Hyde. This can cause a rupture of the veil between the visible and invisible worlds, opening the mystical Third Eye -- located in the brain tissue just above the eyebrows -- and exposing mortals to the assaults of supernatural agents, like the demonic black monkey that drove Jennings to slit his throat. It knows every thing-it knows you, and is frantic and atrocious. Jennings is a tragic victim of his upbringing: a man trained to hide his desires and feelings in favor of others – a man taught to hold the door and wait, to speak only when spoken to, to nod in agreement regardless of his opinions, to stifle resentment with instinctive acquiescence. They’d certainly prefer Hesselius’s version, where a change of diet is enough to effect a real and permanent cure. Jennings is interested in Hesselius’s papers on metaphysical medicine, of which Hesselius offers him a copy. Hesselius calms the clergyman and departs after telling Jennings’s servant to watch his master carefully and summon the doctor at once in any crisis. He is more effective in the “Room of the Dragon Volant,” but serves as a fascinating counterpoint to his suffering client, the Rev. These weird and unsettling texts exemplify Le Fanu’s Gothic writing and were combined with several others to form the volume of short stories, In a Glass Darkly (1872). Your humble servant, Martin Hesselius. Unnamed narrator trained in medicine and surgery but never practiced due to the loss of two fingers. It knows all that has happened. Le Fanu handles the first-person narrations brilliantly. I mean, you don’t have to be a Divell-pestered Puritan to object to sacrilegious earworms. He believes that man's nerves are regulated by a undiscovered fluid -- like the circulatory system -- and that the abuse of stimulants like strong teas and tobaccos, liquor, opium, and others can rattle this system, disturbing the equilibrium of the nervous fluids in the same way that alcohol inflames the liver or sugar irritates blood vessels. It’s treated as notably more exotic than “ordinary black tea.” Does Hesselius believe everyone in China and Japan wanders around seeing demonic monkeys all the time? As they move about the empty bus, he realizes that they are the glowing eyes of a small, black monkey, which grins -- knowingly and malevolently -- at him from the shadows. “Green Tea” appears in the collection In a Glass Darkly (1872), along with four other accounts from the archives of Dr. Martin Hesselius, prepared by his literary executor for the curious “laity.” The most famous of “Tea’s” companions is Le Fanu’s masterpiece, Carmilla. Huh. Everybody’s got attendant demons. [RE: Brow chakra, maybe. Though anxious to administer his Warwickshire parish, he’s several times succumbed to a nervous disorder that drives him to London. Le Fanu presents a macabre and unsettling tale, the events of which transpire solely due to the drinking of green tea. With things as dark as they are now, he has no hope of surviving, but Hesselius has heard enough to make a diagnosis, prognosis, and prescription. Prologue. And it’s always THERE. At one point -- Jennings' darkest moment -- he is walking through the countryside with a party of friends when he pauses beside an abandoned coal mine shaft. Jennings’ bachelor status, his clerical background, his scholarly lifestyle, his aversion to society, penchant for loneliness, devotion to arcane studies, and the nature of his haunting all summon forth the style of M. R. James, and “Green Tea”’s impression is deep in works like “Lost Hearts,” “Oh, Whistle,” “Stalls of Barchester,” “Count Magnus,” and “A Warning to the Curious.” As mentioned earlier, the impact of this tale was also apparently felt in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (whose Sherlock Holmes takes a cue from the leisurely sleuth Hesselius, albeit with better results) and Robert Louis Stevenson (whose own sycophantic, respectable, bachelor protagonist summons a simian Doppelgänger – attesting to decades of profound repression and self-loathing – which drives him to suicide, in Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde). And you can find our annotated and illustrated collection of Le Fanu's best ghost stories HERE! Its toxic, addictive, and insomniac properties were much overhyped, but nonetheless held a grain of truth during the Victorian Age. After helping him undress, he asks a servant to tell him the truth: has he heard anyone cursing? When Hesselius enters Jennings' gloomy study, his ghostly surroundings are striking: "The faint glow of the west, the pomp of the then lonely woods of Richmond, were before us, behind and about us the darkening room, and on the stony face of the sufferer for the character of his face, though still gentle and sweet, was changed rested that dim, odd glow which seems to descend and produce, where it touches, lights, sudden though faint, which are lost, almost with out gradation, in darkness. The central narrative is compelling, even with the dubious theology. Though carefully educated in medicine and surgery, I have never practised either. Nonetheless, Jennings' friends are concerned about him: he seems to be depressed and -- although they downplay it -- he is growing paranoid, and even appears to be seeing things. Le Fanu had a knack for getting at core creepy ideas this way. Green Tea: by Sheridan Le Fanu PROLOGUE . Her first novel, Summoned, is available from Tor Teen along with the recently released sequel Fathomless. For example, when he was preaching, it would spring on his book so he couldn’t read his text. Bram Stoker’s Dracula owes much to Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla. This simple prescription (with individualized touches) has worked for most of Hesselius' haunted patients -- Mr. Jennings, however, serves as a brutal warning of the risks of such a demonic association. The classic “Carmilla,” appearing in the same volume of stories, claims ancestry over the whole genre of modern vampire stories including the better known Dracula. A fine set of Swedenborg’s Arcana Celestia attracts his notice. Jennings, for his part, plays our Jekyll: a respectable society man (and a confirmed bachelor) hounded by his self-loathing, simian Doppelganger – a manifestation of his repressed Id which is summoned by the ritual drinking of a beverage. Hesselius isn’t surprised when Jennings asks to see him. Ruthanna can frequently be found online on Twitter and Livejournal, and offline in a mysterious manor house with her large, chaotic household—mostly mammalian—outside Washington DC. In “Green Tea” our “Jekyll” did not intentionally call forth his “Hyde,” but is accidentally brought from its repressed state by the drinking of a mystical potion. He becomes distracted and lost in his research, and by the time he returns, he learns that Jennings' servant has been searching everywhere for him, and finds the following letter from his master: "Dear Dr. Ordinary black tea is entirely harmless, I suppose Properly British. Martin Hesselius, the German Physician. In Jennings’s case, the causative agent—the stimulant poison—was green tea. Like “Green Tea,” these stories might be straightforward hauntings, or they might be hallucinations, or psychological parables, or symbol-laden allegories, or lies, or some combination of all three. In 1869 he published ‘Green Tea’ in Dickens’s All the Year Round and in 1871–2 he issued ‘Carmilla’ in The Dark Blue. After another three-month absence, it returned so aggressive it wouldn’t let him pray in private, distracting him whenever he tried, visible even when his eyes were closed. Spooked, he got off the omnibus early but soon saw the monkey following him. In many ways the two men are very similar: they are both single, confirmed old bachelors who have traded the warmth of family life for monastic, literary pursuits. At its heart, “Green Tea” is one of Le Fanu’s most psychological tales: like “The Jolly Corner” and “The Turn of the Screw,” it features proto-Freudian symbolism – the libidinal Monkey whose rage against regulation suggests the Id; Jennings’ book-clothed library – a party room converted from its original purpose – with its two soul-suggesting windows and its two self-critical, Super-Ego-suggesting … Welcome back to the Lovecraft reread, in which two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s sandbox, from those who inspired him to those who were inspired in turn. Kept awake by this ostensibly tainted green tea, Jennings begins to see strange things at night: two parallel red balls of light moving about the floor. One bookmarked page has the following quote underscored: “When man’s interior sight is opened, which is that of his spirit, then there appear the things of another life, which cannot possibly be made visible to the bodily sight.” Swedenborg goes on to theorize that there are some demonic spirits which can be drawn from hell to associate with human beings who share some spiritual trait with them; however, once the spirits realize that their companions are mortal and not of the spirit world, they will become driven with hatred to seek their host's destruction. “Green Tea” is the tale of a man haunted because he’s overstimulated his brain and body with, well, green tea; a demon of sorts follows him everywhere. Dive deep into Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's Green Tea with extended analysis, commentary, and discussion We’ve discounted annual subscriptions by 50% for our End-of-Year sale—Join Now! In fact, “Van Helsing” is a near-anagram of “Martin Hesselius,” as “Carmilla” was an anagram of the vampire’s true name “Mircalla.” Van Helsing, as Dr. Seward tells us, is also a metaphysician. “Green Tea” appears in the collection In a Glass Darkly (1872), along with four other accounts from the archives of Dr. Martin Hesselius, prepared by his literary executor for the … Later the doctor speaks to their hostess Lady Mary, for he’s made some conjectures about Jennings he wants to confirm: that the Reverend is unmarried; that he was writing on an abstract topic but has discontinued his work; that he used to drink a lot of green tea; and that one of his parents was wont to see ghosts. J. Sheridan Le Fanu's Green Tea: A Two-Minute Summary and Analysis of the Classic Horror Story. She lives in Edgewood, a Victorian trolley car suburb of Providence, Rhode Island, uncomfortably near Joseph Curwen’s underground laboratory. Jennings comes in and tells Hesselius he’s in complete agreement with the doctor’s book. Green Tea is the story of the Reverend Jennings, who consumes copious amounts of green tea while pursuing his esoteric interests late at night. Immediately download the Sheridan Le Fanu summary, chapter-by-chapter analysis, book notes, essays, quotes, character descriptions, lesson plans, and more - everything you need for studying or teaching Sheridan Le Fanu. It appears as the first of a series of linked stories in his collection of the same name. The overuse of some agents, like green tea, can affect its equilibrium and so expose connections between the exterior and interior senses that allow incorporeal spirits to communicate with living men. Dubliner Joseph Thomas Sheridan Le Fanu gets but passing mention in Supernatural Horror in Literature, even though one of Lovecraft’s “modern masters,” M. R. James, revered the earlier virtuoso of the ghost story. Monkeys are one of those animals that can be so cute until they pull back their lips to expose their killer canines. While he is best known for his novel about the "venerable, bloodless, fiery-eyed" uncle, Uncle Silas (1864) it was his vampire novella Carmilla (1872) that would contribute to defining the horror genre and probably influenced Bram Stoker in his writing of Dracula. “Green Tea” is so much more than a polemic against the once widely suspected, now unduly revered beverage: it is a parable of depression and suicidal ideation, a sour portrayal of self-hate and repression, a complex and intimate expression of the impulse to destroy oneself, and an informed analysis of the psychological motives behind self-slaughter. One underlined passage reads, “When man’s interior sight is opened, which is that of his spirit, then there appear the things of another life, which cannot possibly be made visible to the bodily sight.” Per Swedenborg, evil spirits may leave hell to associate with particular humans, but once they realize the human is in the material world, they will seek to destroy him. There is something deeply collective and archetypal about this frolicsome antagonist: many people – especially children – adore monkeys’ unencumbered embrace of pleasure and folly: they are astonishingly human, but lack restraint, shame, or self-respect. Van Helsing messes up a bit with Lucy Westenra, in the same way Hesselius messes up with Reverend Jennings—both leave unstable patients with inadequately informed guardians, the manservant in Jennings’s case, a crucifix-thieving maid and garlic-removing mother in Lucy’s. There is an extensive critical analysis of Le Fanu's supernatural stories (particularly "Green Tea", "Schalken the Painter" and Carmilla) in Jack Sullivan's book Elegant Nightmares: The English Ghost Story from Le Fanu to Blackwood (1978). Jennings uses green tea – a drink associated with the Far East, once wildly popular (adored by the Shelleys and Byron) until the mid-Victorian period when the unfermented tea leaves (typically sold by Chinese rather than British merchants) were suspected (sometimes rightfully) of being diluted with chemicals and rubbish in order to sell more of it at a lower price (rather like how cigarettes are loaded with floor sweepings, arsenic, and glue). Among the substances discovered in green tea were sheep dung, arsenic, paint, dye, iron fillings, hawthorn, and other chemicals meant to improve their appearance and over-stimulate their consumers. As with many suicides, Jennings' death astonishes his community -- even Hesselius, who notes: "Mr. Jennings was very gentle, and very kind. Martin Hesselius, the German Physician. Hesselius.--It is here. He spends the night going over the case and planning treatment. At this moment, Hesselius looks up into the mirror over the desk and sees Jennings face. The pineal gland is above the eyebrow only in the sense that most of the brain can be so described.]. Privately, he orders Jennings' servant to keep a close, paternal watch on his master, and promises to be available on the instant in case something goes wrong. Also like Hyde, the Monkey shares with his human identity a deep hatred for that identity and drives him to misery in spite of his pitiable impulse to self-preserve (Hyde is frantic towards the end, whining and groaning, pacing like a caged animal, calling out fearfully to his father-Jekyll whom he resents for his imprisonment, but whom he adores – not unlike Frankenstein’s Creature – as a creator; the Monkey on the other hand is sullen, depressed, and submissive until he realizes that his human self can see him – and then he removes his gloves and chases Jennings to his death). Four years before, he began work on a book about the religious metaphysics of the ancients. As in Poe's "Haunted Palace," it becomes apparent that the library is an allegory for Jennings dark mind (complete with the two windows for eyes), and Hesselius is drawn to a desk where he finds an open book (a volume of the famous philosopher/theologian/mystic, Emanuel Swedenborg's "Celestia Arcana") which is heavily annotated. It’s enough to make you call in Dr. Hesselius, and not to be so delayingly coy about it, either. Who, under God, cured you? The first three are short stories, and the fourth and fifth are long enough to be called novellas. It had to be illusion, a symptom of nervous dyspepsia perhaps. Stripped of its theological component, this essential idea is at the core of much Lovecraft. Hesselius also observes Jennings’s habit of “looking sidelong upon the carpet, as if his eye followed the movements of something there.”. Thus we find strange bedfellows, and the mortal and immortal prematurely make acquaintance.”, He goes on to note that Jennings is the only one of fifty-seven such patients he failed to save, due to the man’s precipitant suicide. It had a habit of disappearing at intervals, and once -- after a three-month absence -- it returned angrier than ever, preventing him from praying, by muttering blasphemous obscenities in his ear as he begs for redemption. Rev. While these good people know a decent amount about “Carmilla” (presuming they have never read it – that it is a story about lesbian vampires, that it inspired Bram Stoker, that it is a Gothic mystery), “Green Tea” has only one common feature that those who have heard of it but who have not read it will call to mind: “that’s the one with the demonic monkey.”. This moment, Hesselius looks up into the mirror over the case and treatment! Pull back their lips to expose their killer canines others and himself whose only apparent are... 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